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Williamsburg High School 
Williamsburg, Massachusetts 



Contents 



PROLOGUE 3 

FACULTY 4 

DEDICATION 6 

SENIORS 8 

WHO'S WHO 14 

PROM 16 

CLASS PLAY 17 

GRADUATION 18 

UNDERCLASSMEN 24 

ORGANIZATIONS 28 

ALUM: 'I 32 

ATHLETICS 34 

ADVERTISEMENTS 44 

EPILOGUE 59 



Prologue 



A sophisticated black cover with a modernistic white block set at 
an angle and "THE TATTLER" in bold print --this was the cover the 
Class of 56 had chosen for their yearbook, and looking back, it 
seemed to be an appropriate choice, for it symbolized the future -- 
new, startling, different, and certainly the Class of 56 had been future 
minded. All their thoughts, plans, hopes, day dreams, had revolved 
around one idea: "What is to come? What is my life to be like?" 

They were not alone in their concern for the future, for under the 
excellent leadership of Miss Dunphy and the faculty, they were pre- 
pared scholastically, socially, morally to reach their goals, to face 
the unknown, the tantalizing. 

Was the preparation painful, difficult, joyful, dull, exciting? The 
answer lies beyond the futuristic black and white cover you have just 
turned, for therein is the record of the graduating class of 1956. . . 
read on. . . C.DeN. 



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MISS ANNE T. DUNPHY 



Dedication 



It is to the loving memory of a wonderful person that we, the Class of '56, dedicate 
this issue of "The Tattler." To list the innumerable ways in which our principal and 
teacher gave loving service to the community in which she lived, the school in which 
she taught, the people with whom she came in contact would indeed be a tremendous 
and lengthy task. To attempt to summarize her accomplishments within this brief space 
without neglecting any, would be equally impossible, for Miss Dunphy's charity and kind- 
ness encompassed all. 

But, in future years, should anyone of us be asked, "Do you remember Miss Dunphy?" 
I'm sure his answer would be the same as mine. 

"Who could forget her? She was my friend." 





emor<j 




RUSSELL H. BANCROFT 

"Russ" 

"Every cause produces more than one effect." 

Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Forensic League 

4; Boy's State 3; Pro Merito 3,4; Play 4. 




DIANE C. BESNER 
"Chee Chee" 
"The surest way not to fail is to determine to suc- 
ceed." 
Glee Club 2,3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; 
Play 3; Forensic League 4; Tattler Staff 3,4; DAR 
4; Class Historian 1,4. 




PHILIP A. BOWIE 
"Phil" 
"Everyone should do his best at all times." 
Orchestra 1; Boy's State 3. 




JOAN C. BRA MAN 
"Don't worry, it shortens your life." 
Glee Club 3,4; Chorus 1,3,4; Class Secretary 
Tattler Staff 3,4; Driver's Education 3. 



3,4; 



r 




ROLFE BRYANT 

"Red" 

"A little nonsense now and then is relished by the 

best of men. 

Basketball 2,3,4; Orchestra 1; Class Play 3,4; Class 

Play Committee 4. 



PAUL W. DIXON 
"Bill" 

"Meanwhile Back at the ranch." 

Glee Club 4; Debating 4; Chorus 4; Senior Play 4. 





JOANN DOS TIE 
"Jo" 
"Happiness is meant to be shared." 
Chorus 1,3; Glee Club 3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; Driv- 
er Education 3; Card Party Committee 2; Freshman 
Reception Committee 4; Cafeteria 4; Tattler Staff 
3,4; Class Play 4. 



JOHN DYMERSKI 

"Johnny" 

"Be a live wire, not a dead weight." 

Basketball 1,2,3,4; Baseball 1,2,3,4; Card Party 

Committee 2; Class President 2; Freshman Reception 

Committee 4; Class Treasurer 4. 





JAMES A. EVANS 
"Jim" 
"Self -conquest is the greatest of victories." 
Driver Education 2. 



PATRICIA GORHAM 
"Pat" 
"Variety is the spice of life." 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,4; Pep Club 2; Class 
Treasurer 3; Representative Junior Prom 3; Decora- 
tion Committee 3; Junior Play Committee 3; Junior 
Play 3; Cheerleader 4; Senior Play 4; Senior Play 
Committee 4; Tattler Staff 4; All State Chorus 4. 





JAMES HAYES 
"Jim" 
"Life is what you make it." 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Driver Education 
3. 



ROBERT D. HEALY 

"Bob" 

"The way to be happy is to make others happy." 

Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Baseball 1,2; Class President 3; 

Chorus 1. 




10 




RAYMOND F. HEATH 
"Ray" 
"In order to do great things, one must be enthusias- 
tic." 
Class President 1; Class Secretary 2; Driver Educa- 
tions; Vice-President 4; Baseball 1,2,3,4; Basketball 
1,2,3,4; Card Party Committee 2. 



JANET E. HIGGINS 

"Janet" 
"Small, but oh my." 
Chorus 1,3,4; Glee Club 1,3,4; Play 3; Basketball 
Manager 3,4; Tattler Staff 2,3,4; Driver Education 3; 
Debating 4. 





EUGENE PAUL KOLOSEWICZ 
"Gene" 
"Things are only worth what one makes them worth." 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Card Party Committee 2; Fresh- 
men Reception Committee 4; Driver Education 2; 
Class Play 4. 



RUSSELL LEONARD 

"Russ" 

"They can conquer who believe they can." 

Basketball Manager 1; Basketball 2,3,4; Baseball 8th 

grade, 1,2,3,4; Play 1; Driver Education 4. 




11 




JAMES A. MORIN 

"Jimmy" 

"I've never been hurt by anything I didn't say." 

Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1; Class Treasurer 3; 

Baseball 1; Driver Education 3; Class Play 4. 



JOSEPH T. MOYNAHAN 
"Joe" 
"Defeat is a means of future victory." 
Baseball 1,2,3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; Drivers Edu- 
cation 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4. 





ALICE NUGENT 

"Alice" 

"Petite, charming, and pleasant to be with." 

Card Party Committee 2; Freshman Reception 

Committee 4; Class Play Committee 4. 



LEONA G. SHUMWAY 
"Leona" 
"The world belongs to the energetic." 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3, 
4; Minstrel 1; Driver Education 3; Tattler Staff 2, 
3,4; Orchestra 2,3,4; Class Play 3,4; Freshman 
Reception Committee 4; Card Party Committee 2. 




12 




ANN J. SULLIVAN 
"Annie" 
"The only way to have a friend is to be one." 
Basketball 1,2; Glee Club 3; Chorus 1,2,3; Card 
Party Committee 2; Freshman Reception Committee 
3; Tattler Staff 4; Driver Education 2; Class His- 
torian 3; Pro Merito 3. 



EVELYN E. WARNER 
"Evie" 
"Patience and fortitude conquer all things." 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Class Treas- 
urer 2; Class President 4; Girls' State 3; Good 
Government Day 4; Card Party Committee 2; Tat- 
tler Staff 4; Pro Merito 3,4. 




CLASS MOTTO "A hard beginning maketh a good ending. 



CLASS COLORS Green and White 



CLASS FLOWER Green Carnations 



13 



Most Businesslike 
Quietest 




Girl Boy 

Best Dressed 




^1 



Most Rugged 
Boy 



<r**<mk 




Noisiest 




Boy Gill 

Best Dancers 



Boy Girl 

Most Likely to Succeed 




Class Wit 



Quietest Boy 



14 





» ••B^y ' j^^^^ 



Best Looking 
Girl 



Wolf 



Man Hater 







Woman Hater The one who did 
the most for 
Burgy. 

Class Artist 



Best Looking 
Most Petite Coquette 




Boy Girl 

Most Popular 




Smartest 




Class Actress 



Class Actor 




Best Natured 
Boy 




Boy Athlete 



Girl Athlete 



15 



Class Prophecy 



It is the year 2025 A.D. and the world has become a place of wonders. Students get out of school at 2:25 to 
take a rocket ship to the moon for a dentist appointment at 2:30. Speed and space have become unlimited. 

Practically every object is controlled by pushbutton. The human being has to exert no energy whatsoever. 
There is more time for fun and recreation. 

. Diane Besner and I went to Mars one day job hunting because Earth had become such a crowded place, offer- 
ing so few opportunities for advancement. We stopped by a newsstand to pick up a paper and began to look through 
the want ads. Under the "Situation Wanted" Column this ad in big bold print amazed us, "Wanted -Position as 
athletic coach in a college of high athletic standing by one who has had fifteen years of experience. Salary no 
object as long as there are several sports to be coached. Contact Russell Bancroft--in care of the Moon." Could 
this possibly be the Russell Bancroft we knew? Well, I suppose people do change! 

The Moon seemed to have little more to offer in the way of interesting or profitable employment than had the 
Earth. Of course there was the job on Venus being offered by the former Janet Higgins, but neither Diane nor I 
cared to do farm work or care for Janet and Milton's many children. I wondered--"Aren't those children old 
enough to be of help? Perhaps the farm machines are too complicated for them." 

Nor did we feel properly qualified to apply for the job Robert Healy had advertised: 

"Wanted--Two helpers with mechanical aptitude. Work of a secret nature. Only those really interested need 
apply. " 

Apparently Bob still buys odd contraptions such as cars, restores them, and sells them to museums. What a 
strange mode of transportation cars were compared to our present rockets. 

We decided that there wasn't anything there that interested us and we turned back to the front page to read 
the latest happenings on Mars. We weren't surprised when we read the headlines, "Philip Bowie Breaks All Speed- 
Boat Records," because we knew how interested Philip was in speed-boat racing when he lived on Earth. 

Down at the bottom of the page was an article saying that Joan Braman and her husband had just opened up a 
new rocket ship factory to make Mercury Rocket Ships. Rolfe Bryant was to be manager of the new plant; and, 
he was also going to experiment with different model rockets and see if he couldn't come up with one of his own 
that would go twice as fast. 

On the next page we noticed the article, "Jazz Band Makes Big Hit at Local Theater;" and, the leader was none 
other than Paul Dixon. Under the same article we read that JoAnn Dostie had been a sensation at the theater por- 
traying the tale of an earth-woman in her first-starring role on Mars. JoAnn's acting career began with the fine 
performance she gave in our Senior Class play. On the sports page we read that John Dymerski was playing pro- 
fessional basketball and teaching English Literature at a night school. On the last page of the first section there 
was a full-page advertisement devoted to the grand opening of a new atomic-energy station and the owner was 
none other than James Evans. His attendant was going to be James Hayes. We had a pretty good idea by looking 
at the drawing who it was drawn by and we were certain when we saw the initials P. G. down in the corner. We 
remembered that Patty Gorham had been voted our class artist and we were glad to see that she had continued to 
develop her artistic ability. 

As we slowly thumbed through the pages of the second section of the paper, we came across the names of 
several more of our friends. 

Checking up on the rocket schedule to Earth, we noticed Jimmy Morin had an ad in the paper. He takes 
Martians on excursion trips to Earth twice a week in his glass dome rocket ship. 

Leona Shumway's picture was on the second page of the paper. She's about to open in a new play on the 
planet Mars. It says under the picture "the one time nurse has become a leading actress on the stage in a remark- 
ably short time." 

Evelyn Warner's name was on the opposite page. It seems she's still writing essays on "The Perfect Govern- 
ment." She's become quite famous and I wouldn't be surprised if one day she won the Nobel Prize. 

Ray Heath's picture was on the business page. He finally succeeded in having the Nobel Manufacturing Co- 
pany moved to Mars and has been made Vice-President of the Company. 

The biggest surprise of all was the bit of news we found on the financial page. There it was in black and 
white; "Joe Moynahanand Russell Leonard have set up a new factory for their new machines which make mathe- 
matical computations and translate sentences from French to English." 

We weren't surprised to see Eugene Kolosewicz's name on the stock market and investment page. Under his 
picture it said "Gene makes another million. He is one of the biggest financiers here among the planets and is 
very very successful." 

Another name that we were surprised to see in the paper was Alice Nugent. She was awarded a 25 year pin as 
attendance keeper at the new school in Williamsburg, Massachusetts, U.S.A. planet Earth. It seems she was still 
the only one they could find who had had experience in that line of work before. 

Before we realized what the time was, the 2:20 rocket bus came roaring in, so we closed our paper and headed 
for home. 



16 



Prophecy on the Prophetesses 

The year is 2025 A.D. The time of the year is late spring. In this world of ours many scientific advances 
have been made. Rockets and jets have been perfected to an almost unbelievable degree. It is now possible to 
go by rocket to anyone of the 23 planets outside the earth. Yes, many advances in science have been made aid- 
ing in the discovery of 15 planets in the last fifty years. The age is truly a super-rocket age. 

I am still working efficiently at my profession, that of being an athletic coach. It is an adventurous prof ession 
though some people do not think it so. Important colleges all over the world have sent me letters asking if I would 
consent to observe their teams in action and offer advice and suggestions for improving the calibre of their ath- 
letic programs. 

I was working in my gym, formulating anew invincible football play, on the afternoon of May 28 when I heard 
a knock at the door. It was my private secretary with an air mail letter from Mars. The letter was postmarked 
May 27 showing how fast mail can travel these days. The letter was from the Renseb andNavillus Academy. That 
seems like a funny name for a school but one can't tell what will come up these days. The school wanted me to 
fly to Mars and check its athletic program. The next day I was on my way. 

After a few minutes of shooting through the air, I arrived on the planet. It is a very familiar spot to me for I 
had been there many times. Therefore, I easily found the triangular glass structure housing the Renseb and Na- 
villus Academy. Two triangular-shaped doors confronted me on entering the building. On one of them is written 
D. Renseb, Co-Director and on the other is written A. Navillus, Co-Director. I entered the first -mentioned one 
and was cordially welcomed by a dark -haired woman in her late sixties. 

"It didn't take you very long to get here," she said evidently realizing who I am. "I was rather eager to see 
one of my old classmates again." 

I was dumbfounded by this statement—this woman was unfamiliar to me until she explained that she is none 
other than Diane Besner, one of my old classmates at Williamsburg High School. To top it all off, she told me 
that her partner is Ann Sullivan, another one of my former high school classmates. 

Somehow it had never occurred to me that other Williamsburg people might share my adventurous spirit and 
seek exciting careers on Mars. Of course, I asked Diane and Ann where they ever got such a strange name for 
their academy. They told me that they reversed their names, so that it would sound more Martian — Sullivan and 
Besner were too earthian! 

They then told me that their school specializes in typing courses. Of course, I asked them why typing of all 
subjects. It seems Diane, after her graduation from Springfield college way back in 1960, had joined the air force 
looking for adventure. She served the required time in this branch of the service and then, upon her discharge, 
began teaching girls' physical education at Burgy High, no less. She said that while she had been teaching there, 
Mrs. Grinnell, typing instructor, had mentioned the need for many typing instructors on Mars, according to notices 
of job vacancies she had received. Diane motioned for Ann to continue the story. 

Ann said that she had become Mrs. Grinnell's assistant after having graduated from high school. I wasn't sur- 
prised at this because she had been one of the school's best typists. Deciding that they both needed a change, she 
and Diane had agreed to investigate opportunities on Mars. Their investigation revealed a complete lack of com- 
petent typing instructors on Mars so they immediately set up their school. 

"Your story is fascinating," I said, "but tell me, why did you send for me, an athletic coach?" 

Diane replied, "We have decided our students need some division, to break the routine of 10 hours typing in- 
struction per day so we thought of setting up a program of physical education which I will direct. In line with our 
policy of giving our students only the best, we naturally thought of asking your advice." 

Truly it was a pleasure to give my fellow classmates the benefit of my years of successful experience in the 
world of sports. 

I left, a few hours later, their numerous "thank you's" echoing in my ears and, as a token of their gratitude, a 
gift certificate for a 190-hour typing course at the Renseb and Navillus Academy clutched in my hand. 



17 



Class History 



This evening the class of 1956 is about to step out, over the threshold of the familiar into the unknown. Some 
of us have definite plans for the future, perhaps most of us have only vague ideas of what we would like the fu- 
ture to be, but one thing is true of us all - no one knows whether or not these plans will materialize. 

Though the future is unsure and subject to change there is one phase of our life which is positive and unchange- 
able - the past four years which we have spent at Burgy High. 

The Seniors of 1952 held a party in our honor, a party which was known as Freshman Reception. We were not 
too eagerto attend, and all tried to contrive some excuse for not being there. But threatened with dire happenings 
if we failed to appear, all attended. As we entered the door of the assembly hall, there were the Seniors with pitch 
forks in hand and a devilish look in their eyes. After each Freshman had stood trial and received his sentence, we 
were officially accepted in the ranks of the high school. We did not have any money raising projects our fresh- 
men year and therefore entered our sophomore year financially poor. 

Our sophomore year left us with a few less students, the number was now 26, compared to 3 2 our freshman year. 
Our officers were President John Dymerski, Vice-President, Francis Leamy, Secretary, Raymond Heath, Treasurer, 
Evelyn Warner, and Historian, Margaret Carter. A card party, which we held in the Haydenville Center School, 
raised the large sum of $42.00. This was our only project this year. We were now a class with "Capital". 

Our Junioryear was an interval of concentrated study in the middle of our Burgy High School course. Since no 
money raising project was held, we entered our Senior year destitute, This year our class numbered 26. Our of- 
ficers were President Robert Healy, Vice-President Robert Morton, Secretary Joan Braman, Treasurer James Morin, 
and Historian Ann Sullivan. 

Our senior year was a rather successful one. We elected as officers President Evelyn Warner, Vice-President 
Raymond Heath, Secretary Joan Braman, Treasurer John E>ymerski, and Historian Diane Besner. Our first task was 
to initiate the new freshmen. We held a ceremony unlike any that had ever been conducted before. We had the 
freshmen put on an old-fashioned vaudeville show, under our supervision of course, doing pantomines, singing, 
and dancing. After the refreshments were served, we held a dance in their honor. 

Since we were not going on any class trip, we did not attempt to raise money other than by sponsoring the high 
school play under the direction of Edward Reidy of Northampton. The play was a financial success and the actors 
and audience enjoyed it tremendously. 

Our social activities at Burgy ended with a class banquet, attended by members of the senior class and the high 
school teachers. 

Here we are, Class night, June 20th 1956; here is the senior class seated before you with graduation night just 
ahead. Here we sit with the doors of opportunity and responsibilities open to us. We have looked forward to this 
day and perhaps dreaded it a little too, but now that it has arrived we appreciate our many good times, regret the 
opportunities we may have ignored, but are grateful for the help given us by our teachers in preparing us for this 
day. 



18 



Class Will 



We, the graduating class of '56, being after 4 years of diligent study, sound in mind but weak in body, do here- 
by bequeathour most treasured possession to those we are leaving behind. Where it seemed no one of us possessed 
an appropriate gift, for those we did not want to forget, we didn't deem it too much trouble to secure despite the 
most of inconveniences. 
Article I 

Section I To Miss Lovechio, we leave a senior class, whom we hope will be less talkative with this warning, 

if they aren't talking, what are they doing? 
Section II To Mrs. Grinnell, we leave a pogo stick, so she can get to the office faster when the phone rings. 

We also leave this warning, have it greased and oiled regularly. 
Section III To Mrs. Smith, we leave an encyclopedia of English Literature, so she can check up on some of the 

answers she gets from next year's class. 
Section IV To Mrs. Merritt, we leave a helmet to be used in the study hall for protection from airplanes. 
Article II 

Section I Diane Besner leaves her garrulous ways to Viola McPherson with this bit of advice, be careful who 

you try them on. 
Section II Joan Braman leaves her fishing dates up in Devil's Den to Betty Beals with this warning, be sure to 

bring enough worms. 
Section III JoAnnDostie leaves one gift certificate for a John Deere tractor to Kathline Dansereau for driving 

practice. JoAnn says don't let Mr. Tonet see you. 
Section IV Patty Gorham leaves her scholastic abilities to anyone in the school who thinks they could profit 

by using them. 
Section V Janet Higgins leaves her R.D.X. reducing pills to Bethany Hemingway whom she hopes will use 

them sparingly. 
Section VI Alice Nugent leaves her attendance taking job to anyone in the Junior class who would like it. 
Section VII Ann Sullivan leaves her quiet ways to Pat Moynahan as Pat can add them to her already subdued 

and reserved personality. 
Section VIII Evelyn Warner leaves her attitude toward men to Andrea Culver, with this remark , just be friendly. 
Section IX LeonaShumway unwillingly leaves her fun on the bus with Mr. Tonet to Sandra Kmit. Leona hopes 

Sandy can get the French II class out of more tests than she did. 
Article III 

Section I To Mr. Ball we leave a new compass so that he will be able to find his way to Agawam High, on 

dark, winter mornings better than he sometimes did to Burgy. 
Section II To Mr. Branch we leave an abounding supply of one inch pencils with one question, "What happened 

to the long ones we were supposed to get?" 
Section III To Mr. Bisbee we leave the hope he may some day find a senior class that does not complain of 

the frigid temperature in Room I. 
Section IV To Mr. Tonet we leave a megaphone, one with extra volume, so that his encouragement, ahem, 

to the players while in an actual game may be heard by the spectators also. 
Article IV 

Section I Russell Bancroft leaves his deportment marks to Dennis Larkin provided that Dennis follows the 

example set by him. 
Section II Philip Bowie leaves singing "Oh Happy Day" to the faculty. 
Section III Rolfe Bryant leaves his fighting spirit to next year's girls' basketball team. 
Section IV Bill Dixon leaves the Driver Education car and instructor in one piece, due to no fault of his own, 

to any future student who can handle it as well. 
Section V James Evans leaves his Hot Rod Ford to be used during next year's physical education period by the 

boys who dont choose to attend class. It comes equipped with ash trays, can openers, etc. 
Section VI James Hayes leaves his height to next year's basketball team. Especially, however, to Jerry Mag- 

delenski who hopes to be a "star player." 
Section VII Robert Healy leaves his "absent because of deer hunting" excuses to Martha Hinton. Bob thinks 

that Mr. Branch would accept the excuse more readily from a member of the fairer sex than he did from him. 
Section VIII Eugene Kolosewicz leaves his interests inthe A.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company to Sam Bowker who's 

a slow beginner. 
Section LX Russell Leonard leaves his ever sparkling wit and merriment to Richard Barneas with this warning, 

"Never crack a joke in Mr. Branch's room and be SURE to always laugh at his jokes." 
Section X Joe Moynahan leaves his numerous dates in Northfield to Dave Brequet who has a little more time 

for traveling. 
Section XI James Morin leaves his keys to Drydock, alias Gussettis, to John Merritt. 

Section XII Ray Heath leaves his English IV book to Dave Smith so that he can get ahead start for next year. 
Section XIII John Dymerski leaves his winning ways with the female teachers to Larry Stout who has already 

started practicing similar tactics. 

Signed by the Class of 1956 
Witnessed by a purple -perdudee and 
a certain racing form. 

19 




SEATED, 1-r: Joan Braman, Ann Sullivan, Leona Shumway, JoAnn Dostie, Evelyn Warner, Diane Besner, Janet 
Higgins, Alice Nugent, Patricia Gorham. SECOND ROW: Raymond Heath, Russell Leonard, Robert Healy, Rolfe 
Bryant, Philip Bowie, James Morin, Paul Dixon. THIRD ROW: James Evans, Joe Moynahan, James Hayes, John 
Dymerski, Russell Bancroft, Eugene Kolosewic2. 



Here sits the entire graduating class of 1956, all together for perhaps the last time. We will meet each other 
on the street or write each other letters, but as a class, we are no more. 

So I ask you, those who are members of this class, when you read this yearbook in years to come, stop a mo- 
ment and look at this page. As you look let your memories turn back to those days at Burgy High, to the happy, 
carefree days when all you had to worry about were exams or whether or not a basketball game would be won. 
Think of how we shared each other's joys and sorrows and of the good times we had as a class. 

As the years pass by and time ages us all, the memories of our friends in our class at Burgy High will always 
be fresh and clear in our memories. 



20 






21 




FIRST ROW, Seated, 1-r: Christine Ice, Juanita Terrill, June Allen, Sammy Bowker, John Merritt, Patricia 
Moynahan, Betty Beals, Jeanne Watling. SECOND ROW: Lyda Sherk, Jeanett Samson,Gloria Baker, Sylvia Fer- 
ran, Beverly Brooks, Nancy Hillenbrand, Nancy Wells, Frances Vayda, Henrietta Ronka, Cornelia DeNood, Mary 
Brewer. THIRD ROW: Rudolph Wittshirk, George Heath, David Smith, Allison Lupien, David Berquet, Donald 
Liimatainen. (ABSENT: Walter Boucher, Valeri Beaupre.) 



Juniors 



In September it was back to the old routine of studies, homework, and exams. The class of 
'57 came back to Williamsburg High School feeling proud, for now we were Juniors. 

With our class officers elected as follows: John Merritt, president; Samuel Bowker, vice- 
president; Patricia Moynahan, treasurer, June Allen, secretary; and Betty Beals, historian. We 
looked forward to a busy and prosperous year. 

The main topic of our class meetings was the Junior Prom. 

Our class was well represented in the boys' and girls' athletic teams, cheerleading, glee club, 
chorus, orchestra, and debating. Some of us were appointed to important posts on next year's 
"Tattler" staff. 

As our Junior year comes to a close, we are all looking forward to the day we will be Seniors. 



24 




FIRST ROW, Seated, 1-n Rose Stanton, John Rice, Viola McPherson, Margaret Snow, Alice Hathaway, Ronald 
Packard, Kathleen Dansereau, Elizabeth Boisvert. SECOND ROW: Freeman Sears, Eleanor Leonard, Sandra Derouin, 
Mary Vayda, Terry Smith, Sandra Kmit, Willard Payne. THIRD ROW: Otis Sears, Richard Muraski, Robert Cer- 
reta, Charles Sears, Rolman Black, Richard Barnas, Raymond Gingras. 



Sophomores 



The class of '58 came back to school feeling right at home, for we were now established 
members of the high school. 

The members of our class took part in at least one school activity, for instance, debating, 
glee club, chorus, driver education, basketball, cheerleading and baseball. 

We are all looking forward to the day we will be Seniors. 



25 




FIRST ROW, Seated, 1-n Irene Timmermon, Emilianna McCoy, Barbara LaCasse, Stephen Thayer, Kathy Lavalle, 
Ester Snow, Andrea Culver, William Reeves, Mary Can, Connie Baker, Marion Gagnon. SECOND ROW: Patricia 
Morrey, Judieth Brequet, Martha Hinton, Dennis Larkin, John Judd, Larry Ames, Glenn Richardson, Carol Smith, 
Bethany Hemenway, Charlotte Parker. THIRD ROW: Larry Stout, Charles Roberge, Walter Wittshirk, Brian 
King, John Webb, Frank Kuschka, Richard Warren, William McAvoy, Jerry Magdalinski. 



Freshman 



The first task the Freshman Class took upon themselves was to elect their class officers which are as follows: 
President William Reeves, Vice President Stephen Thayer, Secretary Ester Snow, Treasurer Andrea Culver, and 
Class Historian Kathy Lavalle. 

The Freshman Class didn't have much to do in the school activities except attending the Freshman Reception 
which was given for us. 

In the following three years we hope to take a more active part in the activities and have a few of our own. 



26 



n 





Debating 



STANDING 1-r: Andrea Culver, Lyda Sherk, Janet Higgins, Paul Dixon, Patricia Moynahan, Diane Besner, 
Russell Bancroft. SEATED, Miss Lovechio, Cornelia DeNood. 




Pro Merito 



STANDING 1-r: Evelyn Warner, Russell Bancroft, Samuel Bowker, John Merritt, Walter Boucher. SEATED: 
Cornelia DeNood, Diane Besner, Ann Sullivan, Patricia Gorham. 



28 




Tattler Staff 



STANDING, 1-r: Miss Lovechio, Patricia Gorharn, Beverly Brooks, Joe Moynahan, John Merritt, Rolman Black, 
Patricia Moynahan, Janet Higgins, Diane Besner, JoAnn Dostie, Ann Sullivan, Mrs. Grirmell, Valerie Beaupre, 
Henrietta Ronka, Betty Beals, Leona Shumway. SEATED: Cornelia DeNood, Nancy Wells, Jeanette Watling, 
Evelyn Warner. 



29 




SEATED, 1-r: Christine Ice, Evelyn Warner, Bethany Hemenway, Cornelia DeNood, Margaret Snow, Frances Vayda, 
Mary Brewer, Eleanor Leonard, Patricia Gorham. SECOND ROW: Elizabeth Boisvert, Judieth Breguet, Sandra 
Kmit, Terry Smith, Lyda Sherk, JoAnn Dostie, Patricia Moynahan, Donald Liiametanian, Janet Higgins, Leona 
Shumway, Diane Besner, Henrietta Ronka, Joan Braman, June Allen, Emilianna McCoy, Betty Beals, Jeanette 
Watling. THIRD ROW: James Hayes, David Smith, David Breguet, Paul Dixon, Robert Healy, Ronald Packard, 
Brian King, James Morin, Russell Bancroft, Willard Payne, Richard Barnas, William McAvoy, Alice Hathaway, 
Andrea Culver. 




Glee 
Club 



30 




Orchestra 
Driver Education 




31 



Alumni Notes 



Class of '55 



MARY ELIZA BAKER 



McCallum's Department Store 



RICHARD MARIOUS BRAMAN 



United States Army 



NANCY ANNE CURTIS 



United States Air Force 



JACQUELYN EVE MORIN 



Northampton Commercial College 



MARILYN EMILY PEARL 



At home 



BEVERLY ANN RICHARDSON 



Married 



ALISON JOAN SHARPE 



Springfield College 



LARRY WAYNE SHERK 



Haverford College, Pennsylvania 



DONNA JOYCE SHUMWAY 



United States Navy 



JANET THERESA VAYDA 



Married 



32 





no 



rt<) 







FRONT ROW, 1. to r.: Frances Vayda, Jeannette Samson, Patricia Gorham. STANDING: Juanita Tirrell, Cor- 
nelia DeNood, Beverly Brooks, Henrietta Ronka, Captain, Sandra Kmit, Nancy Wells, Eleanor Leonard. 



Cheerleaders 




With their bright new uniforms and a gym of their 
own to perform in the Cheerleaders have been an inspir- 
ation to the teams. When all seemed lost they kept up 
the courage of all and when the teams were ahead they 
showed how proud they were through their cheers. 

This year they saw their teams through a successful 
season, both in the Franklin League Games and the Tri 
State Tournament Games. 

Since only one will be lost by graduation, we all look 
forward to another year of good work from our cheer- 
leaders. 



34 




SEATED, 1-r: Leona Shumway, Evelyn Warner, JoAnn Dostie, Diane Besner, Patricia Moynahan, Betty Beals. 
SECOND ROW: Manager; Jeanette Watling, Lyda Sherk, Margaret Snow, Alice Hathaway, Mary Vayda, Timer; 
Janet Higgins. THIRD ROW: Elizabeth Boisvert, Kathy Lavalle, Ester Snow, Andrea Culver. 



Girl's Basketball 



Under the expert leadership of Mrs. Evelyn Kmit, the Williamsburg High School Girl's Basketball Team gained 
recognition in the Franklin League as a top team. 

With a veteran team back, the girls put their all into each game and with this kind of spirit they could hardly 
lose. 

This year through graduation the team will lose guards, JoAnn Dostie, Diane Besner, and Evelyn Warner, and 
forward Leona Shunway. 

Many thanks should also be given to Janet Higgins, timer and Jeanette Watling, manager, for all the work and 
time they put into their positions. 

For those of us who are leaving the team we wish to thank Mrs. Kmit for her outstanding work and also to wish 
next year's team a good season. 



35 




SEATED, 1-r: Raymond Heath, Eugene Kolosewicz, John Dymerski, Co-captain; Joe Moynahan, Co-captain; 
Rolfe Bryant, Russell Leonard. SECOND ROW: Manager Walter Boucher, Ronald Packard, Charles Sears, Coach 
Earl Tonet, George Heath, Samuel Bowker, Manager David Breguet. 



Ahighscoring Williamsburg basketball team began its most successful season in history in the Anne T. Dunphy 
gym. When the Dragons defeated St. Micheals by the stunning score of 63 to 44. Our boys continued the pace they 
set in the first game by winning 20 out of 22 games and by taking top honors in the Franklin League. 

As top team in the Franklin League the team was invited to the Tri State Small Schools Tournament at Turners 
Falls, where they once again displayed their skills as a team. After winning the first two games against Wilming- 
ton, Vermont, and Thayer, High School of Winchester, New Hampshire, the Dragons went back to try for their third 
win. This perhaps was the most thrilling game for it was against a strong Northfield, whom they had already de- 
feated twice. With the bleachers filled to capacity, the Dragons put their best foot forward and won a decisive 
victory over Northfield to gain top honors. 

This was a memorable finish to an outstanding season, particularly for those boys on the team who played their 
last game for Williamsburg High. 

The entire first team, co -captains Joe Moynahan and John Dymerski, Raymond Heath, Rolfe Bryant, Eugene Kolo- 
sewicz, and Russell Leonard, will be lost through graduation, but a capable squad of boys will be ready next fall 
to replace them. 

Joe Moynahan for the second year was named to the All-Western Massachusetts Small Schools first team, while 
John Dymerski climaxed his high school career by receiving an honorable mention to that team. 



36 




• $ JC 








38 



Williamsburg High School 



Basketball Schedule 



1955-56 



St. Michael's High 


45 


Williamsburg 


64 


Huntington High 


35 


Williamsburg 


67 


Smith Academy 


56 


Williamsburg 


31 


Belchertown High 


46 


Williamsburg 


59 


Alumni 


39 


Williamsburg 


56 


New Salem Academy 


36 


Williamsburg 


94 


Chicopee Vocational 


21 


Williamsburg 


92 


Powers Institute 


33 


Williamsburg 


87 


Northfield High 


59 


Williamsburg 


87 


Charlemont High 


44 


Williamsburg 


91 


Sanderson Academy 


31 


Williamsburg 


102 


Smith Academy 


66 


Williamsburg 


46 


New Salem Academy 


25 


Williamsburg 


83 


Chicopee Vocational 


38 


Williamsburg 


72 


Belchertown High 


50 


Williamsburg 


76 


Charlemont High 


29 


Williamsburg 


98 


Sanderson Academy 


47 


Williamsburg 


76 


Powers Institute 


49 


Williamsburg 


85 


Northfield High 


48 


Williamsburg 


63 


Monson High 


56 


Williamsburg 


70 


Clarke School 


61 


Williamsburg 


73 


Tri State Tourney: 








Wilmington, Vermont 


20 


Williamsburg 


50 


Thayer, N. H. 


40 


Williamsburg 


52 


Northfield High 


48 


Williamsburg 


60 



Individual Scores 



E 


ASKETS 


FOULS 


FOUL ATTEMPTS 


POINTS 


Moynahan 


246 


78 


118 


570 


Dymerski 


177 


79 


134 


433 


Bryant 


92 


21 


48 


205 


R. Heath 


70 


24 


48 


164 


Kolosewicz 


41 


13 


25 


95 


Leonard 


36 


15 


27 


87 


Bowker 


14 


4 


10 


32 


G. Heath 


16 


2 


13 


34 


Packard 


12 


1 


3 


25 


Sears 


10 


4 


6 


24 


Muraski 


2 








4 


T. Moynahan 


1 








2 


Warren 














Team 


717 


241 


432 


1675 


Opponents 


383 


218 


412 


984 



39 




FIRST ROW, 1-r: Manager John Judd, Glenn Richardson, Stephen Thayer, Richard Warren, Brian King, Raymond 
Heath, Samuel Bowker. SECOND ROW: Ronald Packard, Joe Moynahan, David Breguet, Coach Earl Tonet, Rus- 
sell Leonard, Donald Liimatainen, George Heath. 



May 

1 
4 

8 
11 
15 

18 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

1956 

at Smith Academy 5-5 

St. Michael's H. S. 3-1 

(called end of 4th) 

Powers Institute 12-1 

at Sanderson Academy 4-0 

at Charlemont H. S. 9-0 

at New Salem Academy 9-0 



22 


at Northfield H. S. 


7-3 


25 


at Chicopee Vocational 


9-4 


29 


Charlemont H. S. 


13-1 


31 


Belchertown H. S. 


Cancelled 


June 






5 


at Powers Institute 


*5-2 


8 


Northfield H. S. 


5-2 


12 


Sanderson Academy 


5-4 


14 


New Salem 


7-0 
*Games Lost 



PLAYER 

Moynahan 

G. Heath 

Bowker 

R. Heath 

Leonard 

Liimatainen 

Breguet 

Richardson 

Thayer 

Packard 

King 

Warren 



Moynahan 
Richardson 



AT BAT RUNS HITS WALKS STRIKE OUTS PUTOUTS ASSISTS ERRORS 



.526 
.342 
.346 
.333 
.242 
.194 
.187 
.150 
.133 
.130 
.000 
,000 



38 
38 
26 
15 
33 
31 
16 
20 
30 
29 
2 
3 



13 
8 

16 
4 

13 
6 
6 
4 
3 
6 





20 
13 
9 
5 
8 
6 
3 
3 
4 
3 





9 
4 

20 
3 
9 
8 
8 
6 
7 

13 

1 





7 

1 

4 

15 

10 

11 

6 

10 

7 

1 

2 



16 

20 

6 

20 

9 

3 

1 

2 

5 

133 



1 



IP 

60 

9 



PITCHING RECORDS 

HITS OFF WALKS STRIKE OUTS WON 

30 31 129 8 

8 4 3 1 



16 
6 
9 
1 
7 


3 

6 
1 


LOST 

1 




2 
8 
6 
2 
9 
1 
2 
2 
2 
4 





40 






41 










fc^T^^JS 








w/v a 




We, the class of 1956, with sincere 
thanks, wish to dedicate this page to the 
teachers, and those parents and friends 
who helped to make this yearbook possi- 
ble by their kind donations. 



44 



HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 

Incorporated 



Manufacturers 
of 
Pearl Buttons and Novelties 

Haydenville Mass. 



CHARLES R. DUTTON 



Funeral Home 



114 King Street Northampton, Mass. 

Tel: JU 4-4260 



Compliments of 

JENKINS 



Williamsburg Massachusetts 




Representative : 
Ed CuLLen 

PO. Box l^&8 
C)pr'mgficla, I lass. 



• 



FINE CLASS RINGS 



• 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



• 



YEARBOOKS 



• 



AWARDS 



J O S T E N ' S 



Since 1897 



BERKSHIRE ETCHING 



Manufacturers of Nameplates 




8 Main St. 



The Snack Bar 

Luncheonette — Fountain 
Home Made Pies 



Williamsburg 



Tel. 594 



Congratulations to the 
Graduating Class of '56 

FOSTER FARRAR COMPANY 

"Come here first and save 
time and money" 

162 Main Street Tel. JU 4-8811 


^omp/imexts of 
1& ^/JCassac/)use6ts 


Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON AUTO PARTS 

SCRAP IRON and METALS 
USED AUTO PARTS 

S. R. Shermata King St. 


Compliments of 

ANN AUGUST & CO. 

Northampton Mass. 


Compliments of 
P. Ahearn Co. 

2 Pomeroy Terr. 64 Main Street 
Northampton Florence 

Tel. JU 4-0898 


Compliments of 

CARL'S APPAREL SHOP 

11 No. Maple St. Florence 


Compliments 
of 

WILLIAM BAKER & SON 

Chesterfield, Mass. 


Compliments 
of 

BATURA'S 











To Cover ALL Your Heeds 

KING I CUSHMAN,Inc. 

259 Main Street 
Northampton Telephone 610 




John L Bftnntir, 5e,c W. B*iceU*\<l Nftsta,Pre^ 



Compliments o/ 

I. W. PARSONS & SON, Inc. 

REFRIGERATION SPRAYERS TRACTORS 

FARM MACHINES and SUPPLIES 

Tel. 2885 75 North King Street 

NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



The Mansfield Funeral Home 



Haydenville 



Mass. 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON AUTO PARTS 

SCRAP IRON and METALS 
USED AUTO PARTS 



S. R. Shermata 



King St. 




AQUADRO & CERRUTI, INC. 

General Contractors 



Established 1925 



Northampton. Mass. 



H. L. CHILDS AND SON 

25 State Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Painters & Paper-hangers 
Contractors 

Paint — Art Supplies — Wallpaper 



Awnings 
Furniture Upholstering — Venetian Blinds 

Automobile Tops — Seat Covers 

Truck Covers 

Rusco Windows 

CHILSON'S SHOPS 

34 Center Street Northampton 

Phone Ju 4-1822 



BISBEE 
BROTHERS 

Grain — Lumber — Paints 

Building Materials 

Tel. Williamsburg CO 8-7271 

and 

Chesterfield 2145 


Compliments 
of 

JONES 

THE 

FLORIST 

Haydenville Massachusetts 

Tel. 
CO 8-4331 - CO 8-4333 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 
WILLIAMSBURG 

GENERAL STORE 

MEATS - GROCERIES - DRY GOODS 
GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 
SHOES - BOTTLED GAS 

Phone CO 8-7294 Williamsburg 


Best Wishes 

To 
Class of '56 

WILLIAMSBURG 
FUEL CO. 


U.S. SAVINGS BONDS and STAMPS 
WILLIAMSBURG POST OFFICE 


COLONIAL CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning — Dyeing 
Vfeekly Pickup — Delivery Service 

Tel. CO 8-7247 
4 Main Street 
Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 
Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

LLOYD'S GULF STATION 

Gulf Gas - Oil - Tires 
Accessories and Repairs 

South Main Street Williamsburg 



Compliments of 


BEST WISHES 
the 

Class of '57 




Bradford's Soda Shoppe 






BEST WISHES 






From 


JEAN E. HEMENWAY 




CLASS OF '58 


REALTOR 




Compliments of 


Compliments 




NEWELL'S 


of 
the 




Class of 41 


CLASS OF '59 




HERBS and ANNUALS 


PLEASANT PHARMACY 




CHOICE PERENNIALS 






For Rock Gordon and Bordor 






HOUSE PLANTS 


88 Pleasant St. 






Northampton 


Mass. 


VILLAGE HILL NURSERY 






Williamsburg. Massachusetts 


Phone 457 





Compliments of 

BREGUET'S SERVICE STATION 

FLORENCE, MASS. 


Compliments of 

YANKEE MAID DAIRY BAR 

Steaks — Seafood 

On Route 9 Leeds 


Compliments of 

W. E. KELLOGG & SON 
DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 

Tel. 3631 Williamsburg 


Compliments 
of 

COOPERS DAIRY 

r 


Compliments of 

REARDON BROS. 

HAYDENVILLE 


fr J LORENCE £)TORE 
90/iflPLE ^TREET 


THE FLORENCE DINER 

Maurice J. Alexander 

99 Main Street 

Tel. 3137 

Florence Mass. 

"Catering to all size parties" 


ESQUIRE CLEANERS 

and 

LINEN SUPPLY 

35 State Street 

Northampton Massachusetts 
Tel. JU 4-0532 



Compliments of 



NOBLE MANUFACTURING 



COMPANY, INC. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



HEMENWAY INSURANCE AGENCY 



Carl M. Hemenway 



Williamsburg 



CompUwentf of 




NorthcittipiDn 




atsQQs 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



It CINTCR ■▼. PHONK ISO? 

Northampton, Mmi. 



Complete EUctrlc Kitchens 

Oil Burners - Ranges - Refrigerators 

Wiring Service Sine* 1900 



Compliments 
of 

DAILY HAMPSHIRE GAZETTE 

"Hampshire County's 
only daily newspaper" 



Compliments of 



CALLAHAN'S 5 & 10 STORE 



81 Main St. 



Fl 



orence 



Broo.Rside Dairg, Inc. 

JWilk & Cx^m 

19 Haw ley Street, Northampton, Mass. 
Serving Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

Northampton's Newest and Smartest 
Menswear Store 

CAHILL AND HODGES 

31 Mem 5T. 
Northampton 



HASKELL & GILBERT 

247 Main Street Tel. JU 4-7072 

Northampton, Mass. 

— A complete line of school supplies — 
Portable typewriters for sale & rent 



Compliments of 



HERLIHY'S STORE 



76 Maple St. 



Florence 



Compliments of 

F. N. GRAVES & SON , Inc. 

WILLIAMSBURG 



HAYDENVILLE SAVINGS BANK 

— Deposits are insured for the FULL AMOUNT under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

— Deposits draw interest from the fifteenth day of each month, 
the rate being 3 per cent. 

BANKING HOURS 

Monday through Friday — 9 A. M. to 3 P M. 

Friday Evenings — 6 to 8 



HEALY BROS. GARAGE 



Chesterfield - Phone 2881 

Official ALA Garage and State Inspection Station. 

Complete One Stop Repair Service 
Including Auto Refinishing 

SEE US FOR BEST DEALS ON TIRES AND BATTERIES. 



goto BRANDLE'S first 

To Save Time and Trouble for Your 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

Main Street Northampton 



jnuEiicfr 

15 5t it£ Street KorlfiamP 



Ion 








; 



16 (Wt5 ^ J^thom|^< jtyjy 




G. J. MORRISON 



Prescription Optician 



163 Main — Opposite McCallum's 



Compliments of 

COYNE INSURANCE AGENCY 

formerly 
Wm. A. Bernache & Son 

Main St. Florence 

D. K. Coyne 



$M 




Diamonds 



^/W-Dvjrf^ ^Jewelry ^>We. 

EDWARD MURPHY Prop 
Watches Jewelry- 

Watch Repairing 

139 Main Street Florence, Massachusetts 



SSSCtDAtt Chest 




LINENS CURTAINS DOMESTICS 

177 Main Strut 
Northampton. Mass. 



Compliments 
of 

MacDonald's Shoe Shop 



185 Main Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



SlR'Or 



PHARMACY! 



Cosimo Serio, 
Reg. Phar. 



63 State St. 

Northampton 

Tel. 980 






HAYDENVILLE 
PACKAGE STORE 

Phone 4111 



Compliments of 

MADISON'S SERVICE 

STATION 



McAllister's 
Esso Station 

Gas-Oil-Tires- Accessories 
Haydenvil le 



W. N. Potter 
Grain Stores,. Inc. 

Wirthmore Feeds 
Building Supplies 
Northampton, Mass. Tel 



228 



FINES ARMY NAVY 
STORE 

37 Main Street 
Northampton 



Walter E. Denny 

Optician 
Tel. 184 Northampton 



Jack August's 

House of Sea Foods 
Northampton, Mass. 



SMART'S 
BEAUTY SALON 



Tel. 3062 



Wi 1 1 iamsburg 



CERRUTI'S 

Jewelers 

4 Pleasant St. 

Northampton 



NORTHAMPTON 
FROZEN FOOD LOCKER 

"We honeycure and 
hickory smoke" 
Hawley Street —Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Moloney's Bakery 



Compliments of 



HATHAWAY BAKERY 



Compliments of 



IMPERIAL BAKERY 



Compliments of 

Brook's Garage 

Goshen 



COHEN BROS. 



Northampton 



Easthampton 



Compliments of 
Northend Farm 

Registered Holsteins 
LM & PB Sh urn way 



O'BRIEN'S DRUG STORE 

24 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



jl/lc Ca££uiriS 



150-154 Main Street 
Phone 1310 



Northampton 



Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



fraddnckk 



7 North Main St. Florence, Mass. 



Compliments of 



"TEX" MARTIN 



Compliments of 



THE CAFETERIA HELP 



Epilogue 



Having read the record of the Class of 56 (be- 
fore you turn the black cover which closes the 
book,) what is your answer? Wasn't the pre- 
paration of these twenty-two graduates exciting- 
at the tense basketball games, dull-in those last- 
period study halls, joyful-at the dances, difficult- 
when cramming for finals, painful-when that un- 
expected warning card was issued, memorable- 
on the all-important graduation evening? 

And has the Class of 56 faced the tantalizing, 
the unknown? Have they reached their goals? 
The answers to these questions cannot be found 
in a yearbook, a newspaper, a history. This re- 
cord is concealed in that imponderable Book of 
Life. Wherein is the record of what their lives 
were like, what did come. In this yearbook the 
past was recorded, the future merely symbolized; 
in the Book of Life it was materialized. 

C. DeN. 




Uk 



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